Posts Tagged ‘gouache’

Blue Moon 6

Monday, March 4th, 2019

Blue Moon 6 by Amy Crook, three crows flying against a blue near-full moon in a swirling dark sky

Blue Moon 6, 6″x4″ gouache and watercolor on paper

A blue moon hangs gibbous in the dark of night, mysterious colors peeking out through the mist around it. Three birds make their way across, neither entirely silhouetted nor completely illuminated.

This was almost “three for a death” after a different version of the counting crows rhyme, though these feel more like ravens to me. An unkindness of three, though who knows how many more are lurking among the swirling shadows.

Whether waxing or waning, the moon floats serenely in a halo of its own light, secure that the time will bring its cycle back to full soon enough.

Blue Moon 6, detail, by Amy Crook

Blue Moon 6, detail, by Amy Crook

Above, you can see the moon glowing, the spirals of darkness reaching, and the ravens soaring. Below, you can see this small art in its frame, perfect for tucking a piece of once upon a time into your own space.

Blue Moon 6, framed art by Amy Crook

Blue Moon 6, framed art by Amy Crook

Categories: Floating Gallery, Flowers, Trees and Landscapes, Sea Creatures and Other Animals, Series and Books
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New Leaf

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

New Leaf, decorative art by Amy Crook

New Leaf by Amy Crook

A lot of the time I resist the urge to make things pretty and decorative, so with this piece I let myself make smooth, lovely progressions of shapes and colors all I wanted. I was experimenting with salt on a new paper, which turned out to be a bit too absorbent to make formations, but still left sparkly pools of color. Then I got my awesome new Japanese gouache-like paints out (watercolors, but opaque!) and just noodled about with two shades of green and a series of shapes and patterns.

Although the scanner tends to shift it to yellow, the lighter parts of this painting are a vivid new-leaf green, and the whole thing has a lovely rough, hand-torn edge. I’m thinking of framing it with photo corners on black mat board to bring out the roughness around the edges of the otherwise smooth, decorative shapes.

New Leaf, 8″x8″ mixed media on paper, nfs (sold).

Even my camera didn’t really like the lighter green color, but here you can see just a touch of the salt sparkle nestling amongst the matte paint and finely textured paper.

New Leaf, detail, by Amy Crook

New Leaf, detail, by Amy Crook

Categories: Abstract and Just Plain Weird, Daily Art
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Radial Symmetry 2

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Radial Symmetry 2, abstract art by Amy Crook

Radial Symmetry 2 by Amy Crook, $242

This time I mixed two different colors, a deep forest green and a lighter, seafoam green. The darker green hides in the black paper somewhat, but the raised texture is more pronounced there, too, since the paint was applied in thick beads. I keep thinking there’s a name for this sort of radial pattern, especially one created with beads, but I couldn’t find it by googling.

Radial Symmetry 2, 5″x5″ mixed media on paper, $242, framed, with free shipping.

My scanner had a really hard time with the subtle colors in this piece, but you can see a better representation of both the shiny green shapes and the soft, velvety black paper.

Radial Symmetry 2, detail, by Amy Crook

Radial Symmetry 2, detail, by Amy Crook

I’ve photographed the piece in its frame with my iPhone for scale. I think this piece would look great as part of a wall grouping, along with other art, prints and photos in similar simple black frames.

Radial Symmetry 2, framed art by Amy Crook

Radial Symmetry 2, framed, by Amy Crook, $222

Categories: Abstract and Just Plain Weird, Daily Art, Series and Books
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Radial Symmetry 1

Thursday, October 20th, 2011

Radial Symmetry 1, abstract art by Amy Crook

Radial Symmetry 1 by Amy Crook, $222

I got some lovely new Japanese gouache paints for my birthday, and I decided to see how they’d work on the black paper. I used double spirals inside these salt circles to give the salt more pigment, which also left darker, warmer centers where the water distributed the pigment into the paper. I used a single color of paint on this, and I found that once it dried, the color stays very consistent no matter how thickly the paint was mixed, but that the thicker paint left rounded, bead-like shapes on the paper.

I think of these a bit like beaded decorations, or possibly flowers with their warm orange centers and pale periwinkle petals. I like to imagine the piece adding a little touch of unexpected loveliness to someone’s life, tucked into a bookshelf or sitting on someone’s desk at work.

Radial Symmetry 1, 5″x5″ mixed media on paper, $222, framed, with free shipping.

Radial Symmetry 1, detail, by Amy Crook

Radial Symmetry 1, detail, by Amy Crook

The salt on these isn’t as sparkly, probably because of the matte black behind them, but I love the way the paint makes soft, glossy swells on the paper. It looks great in a simple black frame, which makes the colors really pop. You can see them reflected in my iPhone for scale, below.

Radial Symmetry 1, framed art by Amy Crook

Radial Symmetry 1, framed, by Amy Crook, $222

Categories: Abstract and Just Plain Weird, Daily Art, Series and Books
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Microscopic

Friday, June 10th, 2011

Microscopic, watercolor by Amy Crook

Microscopic by Amy Crook, $199

My nerdity is showing with this piece — it looks just like I remember the view through the microscope in biology class years ago, mostly monochrome with the organic shapes against the liquid.

This time I was experimenting with putting the salt and ink on top of a dried wash of watercolor. First I painted the shape with the opaque periwinkle blue gouache, adding in a sprinkling of coarse Kosher salt for texture once it was partially dry. Once the wash had dried overnight, I brushed the salt off the painting, and then used a blue pen to put in the swirls (and sign it, once we were all done). I put a big chunk of salt on top of each swirl, and then used an eyedropper to add water over each spot.

The water didn’t stay as well as it usually does, flowing into the organic shapes you can see above. The salt and ink dissolved into the water, and then after 16 hours or so, the water evaporates, leaving behind the pool of ink and salt crystals which have grown right onto the paper, and are now a permanent part of the artwork. Also, it’s subtly sparkly, which I enjoy.

Microscopic, 5.5″x4.25″ watercolor, salt and ink on archival cardstock, $199, with free shipping.

I’m still working on finding frames for this size of piece, but the salt crystals that form on this paper tend to be smaller and less fragile, so there’s less concern about shipping it unframed.

Microscopic, detail, by Amy Crook

Microscopic, detail, by Amy Crook

Categories: Abstract and Just Plain Weird, Daily Art
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